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Multimedia Production & Journalism

The multimedia production and journalism major must complete 36 hours of coursework: 33 hours of required courses and three hours of elective courses.

Core Courses

COMM 211: Presentational Speaking. 3 hours.
Principles and practice of effective oral communication. This course focuses on researching, composing and delivering formal and informal presentations. Topics include ethics and public speaking, listening, research, analyzing and adapting to audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of message, effective use of visual aids and critically evaluating public address. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking. Designed for students who seek speaking and critical thinking skills.

COMM 215: Foundations of Communication Theory. 3 hours.
Introduction to the fundamental questions, methods and theories that define the communication discipline and communication professions. Students also will survey approaches to the study of interpersonal relationships, organizational dynamics, public discourse, mass media and cultural criticism as well as the history and development of the communication field. This introduction will help students make informed decisions about the focus and trajectory of their study and career.

COMM 226: Multimedia Production I. 3 hours.
Provides students with the basic understanding of shooting and editing digital video. Using their own digital cameras, students will write, shoot and edit videos under the direction of the instructor. Upon course completion, students should be equipped with basic understanding of storytelling, camera strategies, the importance of sound and editing terms, as well as the skills necessary to produce good amateur videos.

View syllabus.

COMM 285: Communication and Ethics. 3 hours.
Introduction to ethics in communication studies. Students examine conceptual perspectives for understanding and evaluating communication ethics in interpersonal relationships, small groups, organizations and intercultural contexts. This course is designed to stimulate the moral imagination, reveal ethical issues inherent in communication and provide resources for making and defending choices on ethical grounds.

View syllabus.

COMM 351: Principles of Persuasion & Influence. 3 hours.
A study of the persuasive process in contemporary culture. Students study basic theories of persuasion and public speaking in an effort to become responsible consumers and creators of public persuasion. Practical applications are made by presenting persuasive speeches and critical projects.

View syllabus.

COMM 386: Web Communication. 3 hours.
Explores audience engagement on the Internet, teaching students basic web-design and social media skills. Using media-usage theory as a guide, students will develop an overall online communication strategy and web presence that incorporates interactivity and new ways to tell stories. Serves as the capstone experience for the Web Communication and Design minor.

View syllabus.

COMM 493: Senior Seminar. 3 hours.
A capstone experience for students majoring in advertising and public relations, communication studies, and multimedia production and journalism.  Over the course of the semester, students will develop, execute and present projects that reflect the highest performance standards of their major area of study.  Additionally, the course will prepare students for the transition from student to working professional (or graduate student) through the creation of career planning and development tools.  Students will develop portfolios that serve as an integrated and documented album of knowledge and skills in communication and liberal arts studies.

View syllabus.

Major Requirements

COMM 221: Multimedia Writing. 3 hours.
Provides a writing foundation for multiple disciplines, including print journalism, broadcasting, web and public relations. Students will learn about compiling information effectively for audiences and presenting content through social media.

COMM 322: Media Law. 3 hours.
A survey of federal, state and municipal laws governing freedom of speech and commerce in journalism, public relations and advertising, with an exploration of ethical guidelines for professional behavior.

View syllabus.

COMM 375: Principles of Multimedia Production II. 3 hours.
Provides students with the opportunity to advance skills learned in Principles of Multimedia Production I. In this course students will be challenged to think beyond the basics and inject creativity into their video projects. By completion of course students will be able to produce videos for broadcast.

View syllabus.

Journalism Emphasis Requirements

COMM 265: Photojournalism. 3 hours.
An introduction to photojournalism, the concepts and thought processes used in shooting for a newspaper or other journalistic publication. Students will also develop writing for publication skills, as cutlines will be required for each photograph.

Replaced with JOU2013m: Digital Photography from the University of Lincoln.
View syllabus.

COMM 380: Data Visualization. 3 hours.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of analyzing and presenting information for a variety of audiences. Students will learn how to gather data from public and private sources, and tell stories with visual representations of data, both in print and online.

Elective Chosen

COMM 387 Organizational Communication. 3 hours.
Analysis of how organizations are produced and affected by communication. This course provides an in-depth examination and application of theories, contemporary perspectives and research in fields of organizational communication. Topics include organizational structures, culture, socialization, decision making, diversity, stress, burnout, technology processes and leadership.

Web Communication & Design

This program provides students of any discipline with the skills and theoretical foundation to become proficient in the basics of web communication and design. Students will learn how to become content strategists for any business or organization seeking to engage audiences in an electronic environment. Students will be exposed to social media, HTML and basic web technologies, as well as content-creation strategies in the visual and written disciplines. Building on the 13-hour core that exposes students to design, systems, and media-usage theoretical perspectives, minors can choose from a menu of courses in computer science, media creation, and art design to develop an area of web expertise tailored to their needs.

Students completing the web communication and design minor will have gained: an ability to develop and post multimedia content including photo galleries and videos; an understanding of web-hosted technologies for the creation and maintenance of social media networks; fluency in HTML, CSS, and web-design software to develop websites for personal and corporate use; and an understanding of design and media-usage theory to develop functional yet appealing web designs.

The web communication and design minor must complete 19 hours of coursework:  13 hours of required courses and six hours of elective courses. All prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment in the following courses.

Minor Requirements

ARTZ 290 Digital Foundations. 3 hrs.
An introduction to digital media techniques, including capturing and manipulating digital images, web design, 3D modeling, data mapping, time-based work in video and audio, and vector graphics. This course emphasizes creative and critical development as well as acquisition of technical skills.

View syllabus.

COMM 221: Multimedia Writing. 3 hours.
See above.

COMM 386: Web Communication. 3 hours.
See above.

CSCI 251: Introduction to Computer Science. 4 hours.
An introduction to computer science through applications such as media. A major component is programming design and development using a language such as Python or Java. A disciplined approach to problem solving methods and algorithm development will be stressed using top-down design and stepwise refinement. Topics included are syntax and semantics, I/O, control structures, modularity, data types, and object-oriented programming.

View syllabus.

Electives Chosen

ARTZ 267: Digital Photography I. 3 hours.
This course covers basic principles of digital photography, basic printing techniques and Adobe Photoshop. A SLR digital camera with shutter and aperture control is required for this course. A limited number of cameras are available from the department to periodically check out throughout the semester if students are unable to purchase a camera.

View syllabus.

COMM 226: Multimedia Production I. 3 hours.
See above.

Law & Society

This program explores the law’s relationship to historical and contemporary social issues. Coursework in the minor helps students gain an understanding of legal history and legal structures, explore the role of the law and lawyers in solving social problems, consider the philosophical concept of justice, examine how law and legal reasoning affects nearly every aspect of contemporary life and get “hands on” internships and capstone experiences in a range of professional settings.

The minor can enrich many other majors on campus including (but not limited to) business, communication, criminology, English, history, philosophy, pre-health sciences, psychology, public relations, religion and sociology. This is not a pre-professional program offering paralegal training, nor is it required for students who are planning to attend law school. Rather, it embodies the spirit of liberal learning, focusing on communication skills, critical thinking, textual analysis, quantitative analysis and moral reasoning. It will help prepare students for a wide range of law-related careers. Students interested in attending law school should also plan on completing additional courses in writing, logic and public speaking.

The law and society minor requires a minimum of 15 credit hours.

Minor Requirements

PLSC 220 Introduction to Law and Society. 3 hours.
An exploration of the role that law plays in organizing society, resolving disputes and fostering change. Students will focus on the multitudinous ways in which law influences their daily lives and how social groups work to change the law and improve society. Students will be introduced to theories about law and how law has developed over time.

View syllabus.

BSCI 380: Undergraduate Internship Experience. 3 hours.
Internships are designed to help students better understand the connection between theoretical perspectives and practices in the workplace. Before registering, students are required to meet with the behavioral sciences internship director to learn more about expectations, requirements, and responsibilities. Students must have junior or senior status and a GPA of 2.50 or better to be eligible for internships.

Electives Chosen

PSYC 371: Psychology and the Law. 3 hours.
This course will examine relevant theory, research case law and issues of psychological practice within the criminal justice system.

MGMT 321: Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. 3 hours.
This course is an overview of laws and regulations as they pertain to the business atmosphere. Topical areas include procedural laws and the court system, alternative means of dispute resolution, constitutional law, torts/products liability, business crimes, contracts, sales, forms of business organizations, and employment regulation. Case analysis and ethical implications are discussed in each area.

COMM 322: Media Law. 3 hours.
See above.

Other Notable Classes

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